Fluoresent In situ hybridization (FISH)
 

The full name of this technique implies it is a bona fide histochemical technique albeit applied to genes. It therefore localizes DNA or RNA strands in cytological materials. It is the only way we have to prove conclusively that a particular peptide product is produced in a particular cell, since classical histochemical technique may pick up chemical substances which have diffused from other cells or tissues to the area of localization, although form the experience of classical histochemists/cytochemists, this seems highly unlikely.

Hybridisation of nucleic acid probe to nucleic acids within cytological preparations permit high degree of spatial localization of sequences complementary to the probe. For example  in situ hybdrisation can be used to map the sites of a particular sequence..

 
FISH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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